THE MOST TRUSTED MAN IN AMERICA

With 45 constantly tweeting about so called “fake news,” you may wonder who to believe when the news is reported. At one time, there was no question about it. We trusted one man to always tell us the truth.

SERENDIPITY

“And that’s the way it is” by Rich Paschall


With so many bad sources of news in the world, who do you trust to give you reliable and up to date information?  I know it is tough to decide.  At one time there was radio, television, newspapers and your grandma’s gossip across the back fence.  You may also have had a few barroom buddies who seemed to be pretty up to date on the happenings in the nation and even the world.  Now that there are so many more options, how do you know who to trust and what to believe?

Perhaps you still rely on Aunt Mildred.  She always seems to be well read and has a tidbit of news on everything.  When she shows up at family gatherings she can easily dazzle those who would sit down to listen.  She always shows up early to the parties and is willing to stay…

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A Reason to Celebrate

Celebrate the true meaning of the day

Once again it is time to celebrate the Fourth of July.  Do you know the origin of the day, or has it become just another holiday?  A video I saw this morning showed a young You Tuber asking people about the historical origin of the day.  Can you imagine there are many Americans who can not give a good answer?  Some just see it as a day to have a giant party.

Here in the Midwest, some towns began the party last night with fireworks while others are going for the more traditional 4th of July celebration.  I am all in favor of the traditional celebrations.  To me, moving the special events around is a signal that it is all about the party and I don’t think that should be it.

Assembly Room

Independence Hall, Photo credit: Antoine Taveneaux, taken with Pentax K-5

The day is actually about an event that was a long time in the making.  The final draft of the action of the Second Continental Congress was finished on July 2nd 1776 and passed on July 4th.  The famous signing of the document did not take place for a month while waiting for all participants to be assembled.  It did not lead to fireworks although the Revolutionary War had already begun.  The Liberty Bell probably was not rung on the 4th according to historians.  In fact, there likely was no party at all, as the matter was serious business for the delegates of the 13 colonies.

The group had already been meeting for over a year when the Declaration was made.  During the previous July they had adopted The Olive Branch Petition in an attempt to avoid all out war with Great Britain.  The very next day the Declaration of the Causes and Necessity of Taking Up Arms was issued.  The Continental Army was formed and strategies were adopted.  The bitter struggle that followed led the colonies to declare independence.

Three committees were formed in June 1776.  One drafted a Model Treaty to establish a way to deal with foreign powers.  Another was to write the Articles of Confederation to put together the model for governance of the colonies.  A third committee of 5 members wrote the Declaration of Independence although it is largely considered the work of Thomas Jefferson.  Some of his language was likely the source of lively debate.  The result proves that difficult work can be done quickly and compromises can be reached across the many members.

When I put out my flag this morning, I noticed only a few others flying on the block.  It made me wonder how many appreciated the events that went into the making of this holiday.  How many really know the history of the Second Continental Congress that forged the nation we have today?  How many think it is just some sort of day we set aside for picnics and fireworks?  Has the meaning of the most important day in our nation’s history been lost?

It’s your party.  That’s for sure.  As a matter of fact, it is the party for everyone who calls these United States of America home.  When you see the red, white and blue, let them have meaning for you today.  If there was no particular meaning to the colors at the time they were adopted, let them be a symbol today.  They stand for the freedom that allows us to live in a country where we can celebrate our freedoms openly.  The people of many other countries can not throw such a party.

Source: National Archives

A Reason to Celebrate

Celebrate the true meaning of the day

Like last year, we have a three day weekend to celebrate our independence.  Do you know the origin of the day, or has it become just another holiday?  A video I saw this morning showed a young You Tuber asking people about the historical origin of the day.  Can you imagine there are many Americans who can not give a good answer?  Some just see it as a day to have a giant party.

Here in the Midwest, some towns began the party last night with fireworks while others are going for the more traditional 4th of July celebration.  I am all in favor of the traditional celebrations.  To me, moving the special events around is a signal that it is all about the party and I don’t think that should be it.

Assembly Room

Independence Hall, Photo credit: Antoine Taveneaux, taken with Pentax K-5

The day is actually about an event that was a long time in the making.  The final draft of the action of the Second Continental Congress was finished on July 2nd 1776 and passed on July 4th.  The famous signing of the document did not take place for a month while waiting for all participants to be assembled.  It did not lead to fireworks although the Revolutionary War had already begun.  The Liberty Bell probably was not rung on the 4th according to historians.  In fact, there likely was no party at all, as the matter was serious business for the delegates of the 13 colonies.

The group had already been meeting for over a year when the Declaration was made.  During the previous July they had adopted The Olive Branch Petition in an attempt to avoid all out war with Great Britain.  The very next day the Declaration of the Causes and Necessity of Taking Up Arms was issued.  The Continental Army was formed and strategies were adopted.  The bitter struggle that followed led the colonies to declare independence.

Three committees were formed in June 1776.  One drafted a Model Treaty to establish a way to deal with foreign powers.  Another was to write the Articles of Confederation to put together the model for governance of the colonies.  A third committee of 5 members wrote the Declaration of Independence although it is largely considered the work of Thomas Jefferson.  Some of his language was likely the source of lively debate.  The result proves that difficult work can be done quickly and compromises can be reached across the many members.

When I put out my flag this morning, I noticed no others flying on the block.  It made me wonder how many appreciated the events that went into the making of this holiday.  How many really know the history of the Second Continental Congress that forged the nation we have today?  How many think it is just some sort of day we set aside for picnics and fireworks?  Has the meaning of the most important day in our nation’s history been lost?

It’s your party.  That’s for sure.  As a matter of fact, it is the party for everyone who calls these United States of America home.  When you see the red, white and blue, let them have meaning for you today.  If there was no particular meaning to the colors at the time they were adopted, let them be a symbol today.  They stand for the freedom that allows us to live in a country where we can celebrate our freedoms openly.  The people of many other countries can not throw such a party.

Source: National Archives

A Reason to Celebrate

Celebrate the true meaning of the day

Like last year, we have a three day weekend to celebrate our independence.  Do you know the origin of the day, or has it become just another holiday?  A video I saw this morning showed a young You Tuber asking people about the historical origin of the day.  Can you imagine there are many Americans who can not give a good answer?  Some just see it as a day to have a giant party.

Here in the Midwest, some towns began the party last night with fireworks while others are going for the more traditional 4th of July celebration.  I am all in favor of the traditional celebrations.  To me, moving the special events around is a signal that it is all about the party and I don’t think that should be it.

Assembly Room

Independence Hall, Photo credit: Antoine Taveneaux, taken with Pentax K-5

The day is actually about an event that was a long time in the making.  The final draft of the action of the Second Continental Congress was finished on July 2nd 1776 and passed on July 4th.  The famous signing of the document did not take place for a month while waiting for all participants to be assembled.  It did not lead to fireworks although the Revolutionary War had already begun.  The Liberty Bell probably was not rung on the 4th according to historians.  In fact, there likely was no party at all, as the matter was serious business for the delegates of the 13 colonies.

The group had already been meeting for over a year when the Declaration was made.  During the previous July they had adopted The Olive Branch Petition in an attempt to avoid all out war with Great Britain.  The very next day the Declaration of the Causes and Necessity of Taking Up Arms was issued.  The Continental Army was formed and strategies were adopted.  The bitter struggle that followed led the colonies to declare independence.

Three committees were formed in June 1776.  One drafted a Model Treaty to establish a way to deal with foreign powers.  Another was to write the Articles of Confederation to put together the model for governance of the colonies.  A third committee of 5 members wrote the Declaration of Independence although it is largely considered the work of Thomas Jefferson.  Some of his language was likely the source of lively debate.  The result proves that difficult work can be done quickly and compromises can be reached across the many members.

When I put out my flag this morning, I noticed no others flying on the block.  It made me wonder how many appreciated the events that went into the making of this holiday.  How many really know the history of the Second Continental Congress that forged the nation we have today?  How many think it is just some sort of day we set aside for picnics and fireworks?  Has the meaning of the most important day in our nation’s history been lost?

It’s your party.  That’s for sure.  As a matter of fact, it is the party for everyone who calls these United States of America home.  When you see the red, white and blue, let them have meaning for you today.  If there was no particular meaning to the colors at the time they were adopted, let them be a symbol today.  They stand for the freedom that allows us to live in a country where we can celebrate our freedoms openly.  The people of many other countries can not throw such a party.

Source: National Archives

THE MOST IMPORTANT STORY

With so few of our “Greatest Generation” still around, I thought it would be a good time to run this again, before it’s too late.

SERENDIPITY

By Rich Paschall, Sunday Night Blog

A few thoughts on YOUR story

For the past few weeks I have had the opportunity to post a few small works of fiction.  They were just little stories that I hoped would make a point.  While they are no one’s story in particular, they all contain elements that are familiar to me.  I filled in the details with characters and descriptions that would make a story.  That was the fun part of telling a tale that in some ways I know well.  If you read any of them these on past Sundays, I hope you found some enjoyment.  I would like to recommend to you now a more important story.  It is one that only you can fill in the details and it is imperative that you do it soon, before the chance slips away.  That story is your story.

1930s Country-Road

How often have you wondered…

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It’s Your Party

Celebrate the true meaning of the day

It a day of parties and since it is Friday, many may be planning a bigger celebration than usual. That’s due to the fact this may lead into a 3 day weekend.   Your city or town may have started it off with fireworks last night.  The well-known Boston Pops moved their fireworks to the 3rd, not because they want to have an early party, but because bad weather is looming on the east coast.

Here in the Midwest, some towns began the party last night with fireworks while others are going for the more traditional 4th of July celebration.  I am all in favor of the traditional celebrations.  To me, moving the special events around is a signal that it is all about the party and I don’t think that should be it.

Assembly Room

Independence Hall, Photo credit: Antoine Taveneaux, taken with Pentax K-5

The day is actually about an event that was a long time in the making.  The final draft of the action of the Second Continental Congress was finished on July 2nd 1776 and passed on July 4th.  The famous signing of the document did not take place for a month while waiting for all participants to be assembled.  It did not lead to fireworks although the Revolutionary War had already begun.  The Liberty Bell probably was not rung on the 4th according to historians.  In fact, there likely was no party at all, as the matter was serious business for the delegates of the 13th colonies.

The group had already been meeting for over a year when the Declaration was made.  During the previous July they had adopted The Olive Branch Petition in an attempt to avoid all out war with Great Britain.  The very next day the Declaration of the Causes and Necessity of Taking Up Arms was issued.  The Continental Army was formed and strategies were adopted.  The bitter struggle that followed led the colonies to declare independence.

Three committees were formed in June 1776.  One drafted a Model Treaty to establish a way to deal with foreign powers.  Another was to write the Articles of Confederation to put together the model for governance of the colonies.  A third committee of 5 members wrote the Declaration of Independence although it is largely considered the work of Thomas Jefferson.  Some of his language was likely the source of lively debate.  The result proves that difficult work can be done quickly and compromises can be reached across the many members.

When I put out my flag this morning, I noticed no others flying on the block.  It made me wonder how many appreciated the events that went into the making of this holiday.  How many really know the history of the Second Continental Congress that forged the nation we have today?  How many think it is just some sort of day we set aside for picnics and fireworks?  Has the meaning of the most important day in our nation’s history been lost?

It’s your party.  That’s for sure.  As a matter of fact, it is the party for everyone who calls these United States of America home.  When you see the red, white and blue, let them have meaning for you today.  If there was no particular meaning to the colors at the time they were adopted, let them be a symbol today.  They stand for the freedom that allows us to live in a country where we can celebrate our freedoms openly.  The people of many other countries can not throw such a party.

Source: National Archives

The Wearing of the Green

Amateur Night II

English: Picture of a beam in the Guinness Sto...

English: Picture of a beam in the Guinness Storehouse in Dublin. Taken by me on 22 May 2007. Text reads, “Everyone’s Irish on March 17th”. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

New Year’s Eve generally brings everyone out to celebrate the end of one year and the beginning of the next.  In truth it is just another day, but we have turned it into a national day of drinking for the vast majority of the over 21 crowd as well as some who are not quite there.  Of course, we are not the only ones.  Much of the so-called “civilized world” is out celebrating.  That makes the perfect opportunity for news crews to get out and record the mayhem.  The problem with all this revelry is it brings out people who do not normally go out and party to excess.  These greenhorns and newbies become a menace to themselves as well as the general public.  With a national average of 140 traffic deaths on New Year’s, this truly is a bad night to take to the roads even if you were not drinking.

Peer pressure certainly has a lot to do with people going out to do little more than drink past the point of intoxication.  Everyone is going to a party or bar, so “What are you doing on New Year’s Eve?” is a popular question.  You feel the need to have a good answer weeks before the actual event.  “I am going to McDrunk’s Bar and Grill.  They are having a live band.  The Intoxicators go on at 10 and play until 2.”  Since there are so many people at the party, it is often referred to by people who frequent the bars as “Amateur Night.”   This is so scary to some people who get out plenty of times during the year, that they elect to stay home rather than run the risk of getting run down by the drinking neophyte.

While St. Patrick’s Day is not the second deadliest night of drunken driving fatalities for the year, it is the second time in chronological order that the learners and nonprofessional drinkers go out to drink.  This time they may pour down some Irish ale, green-colored beer or other refreshment they are not used to having.  Since everyone thinks they are Irish every 17th of March, or whatever day the local bars are celebrating it, everyone seems to thinks it is Amateur Night 2.  For many it also turns into Hangover 2 or “Dear God, I promise never to do that again, I’m begging you just make me well.”  Since God is not making deals with you, the day after your personal Irish Fest is another day to lay around feeling like you should not move or a time for calling off work.  If you do not show up at your job, however, we can only come to one conclusion.

There are other Amateur Nights as well, nicely spaced throughout the year.  Next up for most will be Memorial Day.  For some it is the entire 3 day weekend.  Beware of those that try to cure a Friday Night amateur hour with a follow-up “hair of the dog” cure.  It is not helpful to cure your drinking with more drink.  According to a past Forbes ranking our third attempt at suicide by alcohol only ranks 4th on the list.  The scary thing is the three-day time span that allows freshmen drinkers to hit the bars and maybe a few cars too.

As everyone puts on something green to pretend they are dressing up for the holiday, they should try to keep in mind that the novices are out there too. So take heed.  If you ae a learner at the art of partying, I can pass along some advice that you will no doubt ignore.  It is best to learn that moderation is a good thing.  Designated drivers are a good thing. “Pacing” yourself is a good thing.  Do not be the one who has to call friends the next day to find out where your car is or to explain why you got your face slapped by someone you do not even know.  Perhaps you need to go to a karaoke bar and sing a lot.  You won’t be drinking while your singing and you will find that everyone thinks your off-key melodies sound great after they have been there a while.

If you survive these amateur festivals of alcohol worship all the way to Thanksgiving you will find that you can give thanks the beginners did not get you.  Rejoice in the fact that St. Patrick’s Day turned into a pleasant evening.  Be thankful that your friends and family survived too, but do not get too comfortable.  While taking your wine or beer with your turkey and football do not forget the amateurs.  Caution may be the key word not just when you are wearing a silly green hat.  Thanksgiving, not St Pat’s, is the deadliest holiday time of all the Amateur nights.  Beware the Ides of March too, as well as the days that follow.

Note:  There are a lot of deadly holiday lists on the web.  While they tend to include all the same holidays, the rankings vary from list to list.  The good news is that St. Patrick’s Day does not even make many of the Top 10 deadliest holidays.

The Wearing of the Green

Amateur Night II

English: Picture of a beam in the Guinness Sto...

English: Picture of a beam in the Guinness Storehouse in Dublin. Taken by me on 22 May 2007. Text reads, “Everyone’s Irish on March 17th”. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

New Year’s Eve generally brings everyone out to celebrate the end of one year and the beginning of the next.  In truth it is just another day, but we have turned it into a national day of drinking for the vast majority of the over 21 crowd as well as some who are not quite there.  Of course, we are not the only ones.  Much of the so-called “civilized world” is out celebrating.  That makes the perfect opportunity for news crews to get out record the mayhem.  The problem with all this revelry is it brings out people who do not normally go out and party to excess.  These greenhorns and newbies become a menace to themselves as well as the general public.  With a national average of 140 traffic deaths on New Year’s, this truly is a bad night to take to the roads even if you were not drinking.

Peer pressure certainly has a lot to do with people going out to do little more than drink past the point of intoxication.  Everyone is going to a party or bar, so “What are you doing on New Year’s Eve?” is a popular question.  You feel the need to have a good answer weeks before the actual event.  “I am going to McDrunk’s Bar and Grill.  They are having a live band.  The Intoxicators go on at 10 and play until 2.”  Since there are so many people at the party, it is often referred to by people who frequent the bars as “Amateur Night.”   This is so scary to some people who get out plenty of times during the year, that they elect to stay home rather than run the risk of getting run down by the drinking neophyte.

While St. Patrick’s Day is not the second deadliest night of drunken driving fatalities for the year, it is the second time in chronological order that the learners and nonprofessional drinkers go out to drink.  This time they may pour down some Irish ale, green-colored beer or other refreshment they are not used to having.  Since everyone thinks they are Irish every 17th of March, or whatever day the local bars are celebrating it, everyone seems to thinks it is Amateur Night 2,  For many it also turns into Hangover 2 or “Dear God, I promise never to do that again, I’m begging you just make me well.”  Since God is not making deals with you, the day after your personal Irish Fest is another day to lay around feeling like you should not move or a time for calling off work.  If you do not show up at your job, however, we can only come to one conclusion.

There are other Amateur Nights as well, nicely spaced throughout the year.  Next up for most will be Memorial Day.  For some it is the entire 3 day weekend.  Beware of those that try to cure a Friday Night amateur hour with a follow-up “hair of the dog” cure.  It is not helpful to cure your drinking with more drink.  According to a past Forbes ranking our third attempt at suicide by alcohol only ranks 4th on the list.  The scary thing is the three-day time span that allows freshmen drinkers to hit the bars and maybe a few cars too.

As everyone puts on something green to pretend they are dressing up for the holiday, they should try to keep in mind that the novices are out there too. So take heed.  If you ae a learner at the art of partying, I can pass along some advice that you will no doubt ignore.  It is best to learn that moderation is a good thing.  Designated drivers are a good thing. “Pacing” yourself is a good thing.  Do not be the one who has to call friends the next day to find out where your car is or to explain why you got your face slapped by someone you do not even know.  Perhaps you need to go to a karaoke bar and sing a lot.  You won’t be drinking while your singing and you will find that everyone thinks your off-key melodies sound great after they have been there a while.

If you survive these amateur festivals of alcohol worship all the way to Thanksgiving you will find that you can give thanks the beginners did not get you.  Rejoice in the fact that St. Patrick’s Day turned into a pleasant evening.  Be thankful that your friends and family survived too, but do not get too comfortable.  While taking your wine or beer with your turkey and football do not forget the amateurs.  Caution may be the key word not just when you are wearing a silly green hat.  Thanksgiving, not St Pat’s, is the deadliest holiday time of all the Amateur nights.  Beware the Ides of March too, as well as the days that follow.

Note:  There are a lot of deadly holiday lists on the web.  While they tend to include all the same holidays, the rankings vary from list to list.  The good news is that St. Patrick’s Day does not even make many of the Top 10 deadliest holidays.